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UZH Magazin 2/18

UZH Magazin 2/18

Many serious diseases which until only recently had been considered incurable can today be treated with some success. Thanks to precision medicine, it’s now possible to analyze and combat cancer with increasing accuracy. In our report, we take a look over the shoulders of the researchers working on the medicine of the future.

Inside Cancer. What precision medicine can do

Bio-Technopark, Wagi-Areal, Schlieren

Our knowledge of how cancer develops and functions is getting more and more sophisticated. Precision medicine enables therapies that are more targeted, less aggressive and increasingly successful.

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Video: Inspecting Virtual Tumors

Learning by Flying

Bio-Technopark, Wagi-Areal, Schlieren

Will our cities soon be full of whirring aerial devices? Robotics expert Davide Scaramuzza is working on making drones so smart that they can navigate fully autonomously.

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Nobody Likes Me

Bio-Technopark, Wagi-Areal, Schlieren

Coming off anti-depressants can be difficult. Quentin Huys wants to find out what goes on inside the head during the process. That would make the decision about whether to stop taking medication or not easier.

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World News from the Reformer

Bio-Technopark, Wagi-Areal, Schlieren

It should be impossible to mention Zwingli without also invoking Bullinger. And yet Zurich’s second-most important reformer has remained an unknown figure. This is about to change thanks to the work of UZH researchers. Bullinger's writings are important for interpreting the events of his time, as shown by an exhibition at UZH.

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In the Engine Room of the World

Bio-Technopark, Wagi-Areal, Schlieren

Can poverty be tackled by systematically influencing the behavior of those affected? Or does that just perpetuate it? Christian Berndt and Guilherme Lichand discuss the effects of social intervention.

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"Siri never says no"

Philipp Theisohn und Johann Roduit

Does the future belong to cyborgs and intelligent machines? Literature scholar Philipp Theisohn and ethicist Johann Roduit discuss the future of humans and society.

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Seeing through the Masquerade

Sylvia Sasse

Slavonic studies expert Sylvia Sasse grew up in the German Democratic Republic. The state wanted her to take up a commercial training program, but she headed to the West and went to university. Today she researches how performance artists stood up against the totalitarian regimes of Eastern Europe.

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Hendrix and Hermès Scarves

Plakat, 1971: Öffentliche Antikapitalistische und Antifaschistische Woche an der Universität Zürich

Fifty years ago, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy Georg Kohler experienced the student protests at UZH first hand. In his essay, he reflects on the legacy of 1968.

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